Saturday, December 6, 2014

Complete: Antoinette Pant & Annie Cami

Back again, and this time with one of my favourite ever makes. Isn't it just so satisfying when you take a bit of a sewing gamble and it pays off?? In this case, I wasn't sure if I could make up this pattern successfully, if I'd even like them on me if I did, and then when I found the fabric it was so lovely I was genuinely intimidated by it. But, since my Pinterest board is full of drapey, silky trousers I decided to bite the bullet and make the attempt. After all, even if it all went pear-shaped, it's not like I'd be stuffing up open-heart surgery or anything...

I'd been stalking the Antoinette Pant page on the Style Arc website since it was released:


They're a slim yet still relaxed fitting pant, with front angled pockets, inverted pleats hidden under an angled knife pleat or fold, and fastening with an invisible zip at the back. I do love the idea of silk pants in warmer weather; they just seem so breezy and effortless. What sold me on this pattern was the way the pleating and folding at the front added drape without seeming to add volume (well, I was hoping anyhow...) and the darts rather than elastic at the back. It looked a really elegant yet relaxed design.

I found a beautiful silk at The Fabric Store in Melbourne in their big sale back in July or August. It's an Anna & Boy crepe de chine called Coconut Ice. In fact, halfway through making these I had a look at the A&B website, and saw they had a very similar style of pants made of this fabric retailing for just over $350. I love being able to sew...

And here they are, with not much hanger appeal, I admit! The close up shows the pattern, though the colour is truer to life in the outdoor shots.


There weren't many adjustments needed in the muslin stage. I made the back darts a bit deeper, and altered the waist facing accordingly. After years of skinny jeans it's a bit counter intuitive to have any volume around the hips and thighs, so that took some getting used to! I did take the side seams in about 1cm from the waist down to the knee; that took a bit of volume out and still allowed for sitting down comfortable without the fabric straining.


Construction-wise, these went together really easily, and the silk was surprisingly cooperative to work with. I've been concentrating on knits so much lately, that I'd forgotten how satisfying wovens are.:)  And these are the most comfortable non-knit garment I've ever made - I really love them. The day I took these shots was about 30 degrees, and I was perfectly and happily cool all day - anyone who's lived through an Australian summer will know what a boon that is!



I didn't realise my hands were in my pockets in every shot...


Aaaand.... a slightly awkward mid-way though turning back shot.


Something that wasn't in the instructions that I added in was to sew some narrow silk ribbon in the seam allowance next to the seam of the pocket. I was a little concerned that being cut on an angle they might stretch out of shape over time.


I also picked up some cream coloured silk from the same sale. Something I felt the absence of last summer was a plain tuck-in-able woven singlet or cami, I sewed this one up using Style Arc's Annie Cami., remembering to lower the bust darts (by 6cm!). This silk did not play so nicely.



In fact, it sulked from beginning to end of the whole miserable process. Yes, it's beautiful to touch and wear, yes it goes with almost everything I own, but oh! I've never worked with such a diva fabric before. It just wouldn't stay put. If I ever have to sew air, I'll be well prepared.


I discovered the hard way last time I made this that french seams don't work when the seams have to open at the lower edges. But although I didn't really like idea of overlocked seams on this, the fabric frayed quite badly (because of course it did). In the end I did overlock the edges and then folded them back and basted them in place. Then I sewed them down like this, at the side and back seams. It's not immaculate, but it's passable.


The one thing I'm really kicking myself over is that I forgot to stay stitch the neckline at the beginning. And yes, the fabric did stretch (because of course it did). So annoyingly, given this is something I planned to wear a lot, the neck binding doesn't sit completely flat at the centre front. Live and learn, I guess. Maybe I'll just have to wear a long pendant to help it sit in place, or at least disguise it a bit.


Still, if I had to make a mistake, I'm glad it was on the top and not my special pants!


13 comments:

  1. What beautiful pants! I love these? I have struggled to like Style Arc patterns but these are intriguing! I might need to invest!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I highly recommend them! For pants, they're surprisingly easy to fit and adjust - pants minus intimidation is a wonderful thing :D

      Delete
  2. These pants are fabulous! Well done with the silk. My experience with silk is more like yours with your top. What a fickle beast silk is!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't it just! If it wasn't so sublime to wear you'd never bother with it, huh!

      Delete
  3. The pants look absolutely gorgeous on you!!! I’ve never made a whole garment in silk - I’ve bought some liberty silk and some of the Maison Martin Margiela silk from supercut but it’s still there... I’m so intimidated by it! Maybe I should embrace your “it’s not open-hart surgery” philosophy and just do it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Go for it - I'm sure whatever you end up making will be your usual amazing work!

      Delete
  4. These pants are just so beautiful! Definitely my favourite make of yours EVAH! :) you look smoking In those heels and I can just imagine the glee you would have felt finding that fabric (and for that matter the rtw version!). Clearly there is silk that behaves, and silk that doesn't behave. These pants would look great in a solid too, to show off the cool pleating..... Love them, gorgeous work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! And I agree; I have another pair in the queue in a solid fabric - here's hoping it turns out to be a silk that behaves...

      Delete
  5. I've never heard of this pattern company before. I just checked out their website and they have some cute stuff! I usually have to grade in between sizes for my bust and waist, so I'm nervous to just order one size. Do you just pick the bigger size and make alterations?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To be honest, I've never had to grade between sizes with their patterns so I can't speak from personal experience, but I'd probably pick the larger since it's usually easier to take stuff in... Style Arc have just started releasing their patterns as PDFs on Etsy - it's not the entire range (yet!) but they are multi-sized, so it could be a good option :)

      Delete
  6. I really love this style of pant. You look great in yours! I have a pair in RTW that I like and now I know where to find a pattern. Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. These are so, so beautiful. I love them. I have the same concerns about trousers with more volume, but they look amazing on you. The cami is lovely too, despite the issues (why is it that when a fabric is difficult, it is DIFFICULT, and you don't get a break on anything?). I'd like a simple cami for summer - just as you've described - so will bear this in mind.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Several years on and I'm still absolutely fascinated by this pattern and slowly working up the courage to tackle them. The flowing drapey silk works so well on this for you! Love how they look.

    ReplyDelete